Fast food and fitness coming to Shingle Creek Crossing

Construction of Walmart at Shingle Creek Crossing is underway as the anchor business of the redevelopment at Highway 100 and Bass Lake Road in Brooklyn Center. (Photo by Katy Zillmer – Sun Newspapers)

Construction of Walmart at Shingle Creek Crossing is underway as the anchor business of the redevelopment at Highway 100 and Bass Lake Road in Brooklyn Center. (Photo by Katy Zillmer – Sun Newspapers)

As more and more bricks are added to the Walmart store at Shingle Creek Crossing, Highway 100 and Bass Lake Road in Brooklyn Center, the city

The food court building from Brookdale Mall sits ready for redevelopment as part of Shingle Creek Crossing. (Photo by Katy Zillmer- Sun Newspapers)

The food court building from Brookdale Mall sits ready for redevelopment as part of Shingle Creek Crossing. (Photo by Katy Zillmer- Sun Newspapers)

has announced four new businesses slated for the development: Chick-fil-a, Popeye’s, Dairy Queen and LA Fitness.

The businesses will be separate buildings on the property, which also has the food court building from Brookdale Mall to be redeveloped.  The rest of Brookdale Mall was demolished in August of 2011. Kohl’s and Sears remain on the site and open for business.

When complete Shingle Creek Crossing will be an indoor/outdoor mall with four multi-tenant buildings, three “junior box” stores, such as Staples or Office Max, and six restaurants.

LA Fitness will be on the northwest portion of the property, behind an existing Holiday gas station, said Brooklyn Center planning and zoning specialist Tim Benetti.

The three restaurants will be on the north end of the site, he said.

City staff announced the plans for the new businesses at the Brooklyn Center Planning Commission meeting May 17.

Gatlin Development Co. is the developer on the project, which is overall ahead of schedule because of the mild winter.

Walmart could be open in mid-to-late summer, Benetti said.

Plans for the site also include opening up Shingle Creek and access to regional trail systems to and from the businesses.

Originally, Gatlin planned to have its application for the redevelopment of the food court ready for the planning commission meeting on May 17. The developer has requested an extension and the plans should be reviewed at one of the commission’s June meetings, Benetti said.

The delay shouldn’t impact the development schedule overall at Shingle Creek, he said.

Developers from Gatlin have also been in discussion with the city about two additional businesses for the site.

Gatlin’s delayed application will change to include a proposal to the city to approve one of the businesses; and the other would require a zoning amendment in order to be built there, Benetti said.

Currently the property is zoned as a Central Commerce District, which does not permit “sauna establishments, massage, currency exchanges, pawn shops and second-hand goods dealers,” he said.

One of the possible businesses for Shingle Creek is in those categories; therefore city staff and Gatlin CEO Frank Gatlin will seek input from the Brooklyn City Council at a work session at 6 p.m. Tuesday, May 29.

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