Tech Dump makes home in Golden Valley

Tech Dump accepts a number of electronics. Those that can be reused will be refurbished and resold. Those that cannot will be recycled properly. (Submitted photo)
Tech Dump accepts a number of electronics. Those that can be reused will be refurbished and resold. Those that cannot will be recycled properly. (Submitted photo)

Tech Dump, an electronics recycling program, is making Golden Valley its new home after three years located in Plymouth.

The company was looking to expand and be more centrally located in the Twin Cities.

“We are excited to partner with Golden Valley and call it our new home,” said Tom McCullough, exectuive director. “The community is a perfect location for us, and we already feel welcomed.”

Tech Dump will be be open 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, at 825 Boone Ave. N., Ste. 100, Golden Valley.

Tech Dump is a division of the nonprofit Jobs Foundation, which provides stable jobs to economically disadvantaged adults. It began as a way to solve a social issue.

Founders George Lee and McCullough saw that it was difficult for certain people to retain jobs when they had something from their past holding them back.

The Jobs Foundation started in 2010 with furniture resale. The foundation obtained donations of furniture that workers refurbished and resold to local buyers.

Lee and McCullough, also founders of Jobs Foundation, soon realized there was a need for recycling and refurbishing of electronics. Tech Dump allows anyone to bring in and donate electronics of almost any kind.

The most popular items include phones, computers, microwaves, TVs, electrical cords, batteries, iPods and printers. The entire list is nearly endless.

According to Amanda LaGrange, director of marketing, only about 25 percent of all electronics are being recylced.

The furniture business eventually was replaced by Tech Dump.

Tech Dump will host grand opening event 2-4 p.m., Aug. 27 to encourage individuals to visit with unused electronics. (Submitted photo)
Tech Dump will host grand opening event 2-4 p.m., Aug. 27 to encourage individuals to visit with unused electronics. (Submitted photo)

“The more we can make recycling convenient the easier it is to get people to do it,” she said.

When individuals drop off an electronic item, a worker will decide if it can be refurbished and reused or recycled.

Typically newer products can be reused, but a piece that is 20 or 30 years old is often recycled. In either case, any data stored on the device is destroyed.

That is something the foundation takes very seriously. Their process has been approved by the National Association for Information Destruction.

If the product can be reused the electronics are repaired and the item is sold on Ebay.

If the product needs to be recycled the materials are separated and recycled properly.

Most electronics are accepted with no charge; however, there are a select few that require a fee.

TVs and monitors may carry a fee of $10-$40.

All of Tech Dump’s employees are benefiting from Jobs Foundation and may have struggled to obtain a job previously

Proceeds made from the reselling of products or materials goes to pay Tech Dump’s employees.

Tech Dump is unique in that it holds not only a profitable goal but a social goal as well.

“(Our employees) learn how to have a job, be on time, respect managers, be accountable for their work,” LaGrange said.

McCullough describes its as a “win, win, win” situation.

“We provide free electronics recycling to businesses and individuals, while ensuring materials are recycled in the correct and proper waste stream,” he said. “Lastly, we do all this so that we can provide adults with barriers to employment jobs and on-the-job training.”

If you go

Tech Dump grand opening

2-4 p.m., Tuesday, Aug. 27

825 Boone Ave. N., Ste. 100, Golden Valley

Mayor Shep Harris will be in attendance at the ribbon cutting ceremony at 2 p.m.

Refreshments and tours will be available

 

Contact Gina Purcell at [email protected]