Golden Valley hits milestone with new community center

Golden Valley’s new Brookview Community Center construction looking southeast. The steel frame is complete. Next, Adolfson and Peterson Construction will pour the concrete upper level deck, make the building water tight, install exterior walls and masonry and begin working inside the building. (Sun Post staff photo by Gina Purcell)
Golden Valley’s new Brookview Community Center construction looking southeast. The steel frame is complete. Next, Adolfson and Peterson Construction will pour the concrete upper level deck, make the building water tight, install exterior walls and masonry and begin working inside the building. (Sun Post staff photo by Gina Purcell)

Golden Valley City Council received an update March 14 on the construction of the new Brookview Community Center.
Jack Webber, of Adolfson and Peterson Construction, told the council that the steel frame is complete but that the project remains three or four weeks behind schedule due to a delayed start and weather issues.
To make up for the delay, the construction company has 15 to 20 employees working 10-hour shifts and more employees will be added to the project in the future.
“We’ll accelerate the schedule being mindful of the budget, to get to the targeted opening date,” Webber said.
According to Webber, the construction company expects to pour the concrete upper level deck in the near future. A temporary shelter will be constructed to provide heat to the project until the building is enclosed. The building will be water tight by mid-May followed by the installation of the exterior walls and masonry. Then, work can begin inside the building.
Parks and Recreation staff members hope to move out of the existing facility in September and host a grand opening event for the new building in mid-November.
In addition to a new facility, Golden Valley is re-branding Brookview and the center’s many amenities.
Golden Valley residents Mark Saunders, a creative director for in-store marketing at Target, and Wes Hoefer, an entrepreneur who pursued various tech startups and founded digital agency Engage the Crowd, offered their professional skills on the new brand.
On March 14, Saunders and Cheryl Weiler, city communications manager, presented the re-branding ideas to the council.
Saunders explained that when branding, he looks at three elements, ethos, name and identity.
Ethos is the meaning, value and purpose of the brand. Name is what the brand is, what it is called and how it can be found. Identity is the logo, he said.
Weiler, Saunders and Hoefer worked to identify certain themes for Brookview. The themes fell under three key terms, welcoming, inclusive and recreation. When thinking about creating a welcoming facility the words warmth, service and pride came to mind. The term inclusive brought to mind the idea of togetherness, access and value. The theme of recreation made the group think of play and wellness, group activity and green preservation.
The themes mirror that of Envision Golden Valley, a group of citizens who developed ideas for the future of Golden Valley.
Saunders posed the question: “Do you want to get married at a community?”
“Community center is not a word that applied to this new great building,” he said.
The group brainstormed terms and ultimately favored the name of Brookview Commons.
According to Saunders, the term commons indicates a multifunction venue, a meeting point.
“When we got done with Envision Golden Valley, they talked about Golden Valley Commons throughout that and what that meant,” Weiler said. “This kind of all fits, it rings true.”
The group thought Brookview Golden Valley could be the main brand with Brookview Commons, Brookview Golf and Lawn Bowling and Brookview Park branding specific amenities within the Brookview area.
Saunders, Hoefer and Weiler created a potential name for the grill, Three One Six Bar and Grill.
The trio looked at local mid-century modern architecture and architectural signage when looking for a logo style. They noticed most fonts used were all capital letters. Then, they thought about the city’s features, Bassett Creek, the suspension bridges and ponds on the golf course.
A clean, modern logo was created, one that mimicked the shape of a suspension bridge. Colors used include navy, stone, “Brookview blue,” and green.
The council viewed various images at the March 14 meeting and members had varying opinions.
“I like every single thing but I don’t like (the term) Commons,” said Councilmember Joanie Clausen. “(The new facility) just seems more special than that. It just doesn’t grab me at all.”
Councilmember Andy Snope said he likes “Commons.”
Councilmember Steve Schmidgall stood and literally applauded their work, saying how much he loved it all.
“That’s the coolest thing I’ve seen since I’ve been on the council,” he said.
Councilmember Larry Fonnest said this is a giant step forward for the city.
Mayor Shep Harris wondered if the re-branding group could ask residents, the Open Space and Recreation Committee or Historical Society if they had feedback regarding the name.
Weiler said the public input part is most beneficial when determining the meaning and purpose of Brookview.
City Manager Tim Cruikshank questioned if the city’s iconic golden swoosh could be added to the logo.
Council members expressed mixed feelings about adding the swoosh to the design.
Overall the council was thrilled about the re-branding efforts but wanted residents’ feedback.
The city is planning focus groups where residents can view variations of the proposed new brand and name “Commons.”
To participate in a focus group, contact Communications Manager Cheryl Weiler at 763-593-8004 by 4:30 p.m. Monday, March 26.
Contact Gina Purcell at [email protected]